Pacific Crest Trail Film Premier May 19 at College of the Siskiyous

The Pacific Crest Trail Association, in partnership with the Mt Shasta Trail Association and the College of the Siskiyous, is pleased to announce the free public premier screening of the visually stunning National Geographic Channel’s new film, “America’s Wild Places,” starring the Pacific Crest Trail.

“This adventurous film presents an array of many of the spectacular scenes hikers can encounter on this 2,650 mile-long footpath that courses from Campo, California, at the U.S./Mexican border, to Manning Park in British Columbia, Canada,” says MSTA President Joe Wirth. “For outdoor enthusiasts who don’t have the time or endurance to hike the entire route, this is the best chance you’ll have for learning why the trail was created, how it is used today, and what it offers to hikers.”

Some of the more diverse features that can be encountered along the route from the south to the north include the cactus gardens of Anza Borrego Desert, the glaciated peaks of the High Sierra, Forester Pass at 13,153-foot elevation (highest point on the PCT), Devil’s Postpile, Crater Lake National Park, Three Sisters Wilderness, Mount Hood Wilderness, Cascade Locks (lowest point on the trail), Bridge of the Gods, Mount Adams, Snoqualmie Pass, and the North Cascades National Park.

When added up, the total elevation change along the entire route is 300,000 feet. Whew! Each year about 300 “thru-hikers” attempt to do the entire route in about four months, and they must deal with setting up food caches, severe weather, dehydration, and pesky black bears. Hikers must be prepared for climate extremes from scorching deserts in the south to drenching rainforests in the north. Displays of sprawling wildflowers create colorful breaks between towering stands of solemn old-growth forests.

”This special screening is an opportunity for you to see the Pacific Crest Trail like you’ve never seen it before, even if you’ve hiked it!” says Wirth. “And if you’re considering getting out onto the PCT, this film will only motivate you further to make your PCT experience happen! We have 120 miles of the PCT in Siskiyou County, and the trek from Burney Falls to the Oregon Border totals a challenging 275 miles.”

Liz Bergeron, Executive Director of the Pacific Crest Trail Association, will be on hand to answer questions, and a dedicated, hard working PCT trail work crew will explain the challenges of creating and maintaining the trail.

Program time and date: 7:00 PM, Wednesday May 19th.
Place: the COS campus in Weed: Building 3, Room 3, the Life Sciences Building, adjacent to Parking Lot A.
Admission: Free.
Food and Drink: Coffee and desserts will be served.
More information: 926-2858

Mount Shasta from the Pacific Crest Trail. (Photo by John Soares)
Mount Shasta from the Pacific Crest Trail. (Photo by John Soares)
The Pacific Crest Trail Association, in partnership with the Mt Shasta Trail
Association and the College of the Siskiyou, is pleased to announce the free
public primer screening of the visually stunning National Geographic
Channel¹s new film, ³America¹s Wild Places², starring the Pacific Crest
Trail.

³This adventurous film presents an array of many of the spectacular scenes
hikers can encounter on this 2,650 mile-long footpath that courses from
Campo, California, at the U.S./Mexican border, to Manning Park in British
Columbia, Canada,² says MSTA President Joe Wirth. ³For outdoor enthusiasts
who don¹t have the time or endurance to hike the entire route, this is the
best chance you¹ll have for learning why the trail was created, how it is
used today, and what it offers to hikers.²

Some of the more diverse features that can be encountered along the route
from the south to the north include the cactus gardens of Anza Borrego
Desert, the glaciated peaks of the High Sierra, Forester Pass at 13,153 feet
elevation (highest point on the PCT), Devil¹s Postpile, Crater Lake National
Park, Three Sisters Wilderness, Mount Hood Wilderness, Cascade Locks (lowest
point on the trail), Bridge of the Gods, Mount Adams, Snoqualmie Pass, and
the North Cascades National Park.

When added up, the total elevation change along the entire route is 300,000
feet. Whew! Each year about 300 ³Thru-hikers² attempt to do the entire route
in about four months, and they must deal with setting up food caches, severe
weather, dehydration, and pesty black bears. Hikers must be prepared for
climate extremes from scorching deserts in the south to drenching
rainforests in the north. Displays of sprawling wildflowers create colorful
breaks between towering stands of solemn old-growth forests.

³This special screening is an opportunity for you to see the Pacific Crest
Trail like you¹ve never seen it before, even if you¹ve hiked it!² says
Wirth.  ³And if you¹re considering getting out onto the PCT, this film will
only motivate you further to make your PCT experience happen! We have 120
miles of the PCT in Siskiyou County, and the trek from Burney Falls to the
Oregon Border totals a challenging 275 miles.²

Liz Bergeron, Executive Director of the Pacific Crest Trail Association,
will be on hand to answer questions, and a dedicated, hard working PCT trail
work crew will explain the challenges of creating and maintaining the trail.

Program time and date: 7:00 PM, Wednesday May 19th.
Place:  the COS campus in Weed: Building 3, Room 3, the Life Sciences
Building, adjacent to Parking Lot A.
Admission:  Free.
Coffee and deserts will be served.
More information: 926-2858