10,000 acre Land Deal Along the Trinity Divide Benefits the Pacific Crest Trail

Bull Lake

Just last week it was announced that over 10,000 acres of private timber industry lands have been purchased for addition to the Shasta-Trinity and Klamath National Forests.  The land acquisition was spearheaded by our partners at the Pacific Crest Trail Association as these lands contain a 17-mile stretch of the National Scenic Trail that goes from Mexico to Canada.  These parcels are literally in our backyard as they are scattered from Castle Crags to Scott Mountain and contain a diversity of landscapes, geology and plants.

Here’s some links for more information on this great event:

PCTA

SF Chronicle

Pacific Crest Trail Volunteer Opportunities

Want to volunteer to help maintain the Pacific Crest Trail this summer?  Then check out the Pacific Crest Trail Association’s website where a variety of projects are listed in both a table and an interactive map:

http://www.pcta.org/volunteer/project-schedule/

In our local area there are Northern California Pacific Crest Trail section projects scheduled for Deadfall Lakes, Toad Lake, Soapstone, Section “O” and Soda Creek.  These work projects range from a single day of trail maintenance, up to 10 days of camping out while working. The regional groups coordinating these work parties include Lyons’ Pride, the NorCal Trail Crew, and the American Conservation Experience (ACE) crews.

For more information contact our local PCTA representative Ian Nelson at inelson@pcta.org or phone him at 541-778-3252.

trail work

Pacific Crest Trailside Reader Presentation on Saturday, March 24, at COS

The 2,650 mile long Pacific Crest Trail (or PCT) spans the length of the Western United States.  It traverses some of the most spectacular landscape on the planet from the high desert of the Mojave to the frigid, snow-covered North Cascades, from the lush forests of Oregon to the High Sierra.  There is little wonder that the PCT has become the world’s premier walking trail.

Two Humboldt County authors, Rees Hughes and Corey Lewis, have collected nearly 100 stories that explore the people, places, and history of the Pacific Crest Trail in the two-volume The Pacific Crest Trailside ReaderThe Pacific Crest Trailside Readers bring together short excerpts from classic works of regional writing with boot-tested stories from the trail.

On Saturday, March 24th, 2012, beginning at 7:00 p.m. at the College of the Siskiyous, in Life Science Room 3, Hughes and Lewis will read stories from The Readers and show images representative of the length of the trail.  This free event is sponsored by the COS Creative Writing Program and the Mt. Shasta Trail Association.

Pacific Crest Trail above Glen Aulin. (Photo by Jim Peacock)
Pacific Crest Trail above Glen Aulin. (Photo by Jim Peacock)

At the heart of these anthologies are modern day trail tales—stories taken from PCT hikers that recount trailside humor and traditions, “trail angels” and “trail magic,” encounters with wildlife and wild weather, stories of being lost and found, and unusual incidents along the Pacific Crest Trail in Northern California and also Southern California, Oregon, and Washington. Revealing a larger context are historical accounts of events such as Moses Schallenberger’s winter on Donner Pass and or Joaquin Miller’s story about the battle of Castle Crags; Native American myths and legends such as that of Lost Lake near Mount Hood; and selections from highly-regarded environmental writers who have captured the region in print, including Mary Austin in The Land of Little Rain; John Muir in The Mountains of California; and David Rains Wallace in The Klamath Knot.   “The stories are situated geographically along the trails,” Lewis said. “If you happen to be hiking through the Russian Wilderness, flip open the book and read from authors who wrote about the area.”

Both Hughes and Lewis have spent considerable time on the PCT.  Hughes, who first walked the Washington section of the PCT in 1981, noted that, “we both have had a long-term love affair with the PCT and felt that this was a perfect way to give back.”  All author royalties are being returned to the support and protection of the PCT.

Pacific Crest Trailside Reader.

PCT Maintenance and Training in Castle Crags State Park, June 25, 2011

Summer is finally here – Are you ready to hit the trails?

It’s time to replace our winter boots, scarves, and mittens with hiking boots, hard hats and gloves! We’re ready to hit the trails and we would love for you join us! The Mount Shasta Trail Association and the Pacific Crest Trail Association invite you on a one-day trail maintenance and training session where we’ll learn about:

* Trail Safety
* Trail Maintenance Tools
* Terminology

We’ll apply our new knowledge to the Pacific Crest Trail by repairing tread and improving the corridor. This project is great for beginner’s and for those who are ready to get warmed up for a great trail maintenance season! In other words, all skill levels are welcome!

When: Saturday, June 25 from 9:00 am to 2:00ish pm

Where: Parking area at Soda Creek Road Exit (this is where the PCT crosses I-5 just north of the Castle Crags State Park entrance). Directions will be provided upon registration.

What to Bring: Volunteers will need to bring day packs, lunch, water, and work clothes (i.e. pants, sturdy boots). Safety gear and tools will be provided.

Fitness Requirement: This project is great for everyone! Volunteers will hike 1-2 miles throughout the day on the Pacific Crest Trail.

Positions Available: 10-12

Nearby attractions: Camping and hiking in Castle Crags State Park, fishing along the Sacramento River, and gazing at beautiful Mount Shasta!

To Register: Please contact Robert Francisco at Shastamountain@gmail.com or call (916) 955-8641.

We’re looking forward to seeing you on the Pacific Crest Trail!

Seven Lakes Basin Hike on the PCT on Saturday, September 25

The Mount Shasta Trail Association invites you to join us on a spectacular hike along the Pacific Crest Trail ridge overlooking the pristine lakes of Seven Lake Basin as well as Mumbo Basin. This gentle to moderate 5 mile roundtrip walk has superb long-range vistas. We will be able to see panoramas of the Trinity Alps, Trinity Divide, Mt. Shasta, Mt. Eddy, Lassen Peak, Magee Peak, Burney Mountain as well as the granite cliffs of the Castle Crags.

Meet 9 am at the Fish Hatchery in Mount Shasta. (Take the second/main Mount Shasta exit and go a quarter-mile west away from town and the mountain.) Bring lunch and water. We expect to be back by 3 pm. Any further questions:  call Joan Roemer 926-0647.

Seven Lakes Basin. (Photo by John Soares)
Seven Lakes Basin. (Photo by John Soares)

Deadfall Lakes and Mount Eddy Hike on Saturday, August 28

For the most amazing views, come along with the Mt. Shasta Trail Association on a rewarding day hike to pristine Deadfall Lakes and to the top of Mt. Eddy. This 10 mile roundtrip hike starts out gently on the Pacific Crest Trail to the multiple lakes and then becomes challenging as we gain 2,250 feet to the summit at 9,025 feet.

Mt. Eddy was formed between 400 & 65 million years ago from peridotite, a volcanic form of serpentine. This type of rock (ultramafic) is high in magnesium and low in calcium, and as such the soils derived from this material constitute a harsh growing medium for most plants. Like with other serpentine areas, the result is that some plants adapt to the harsh conditions, taking advantage of the relative lack of competition, and evolve to become endemic to the site. The iron contained in the rock rusts, giving it its reddish tint. It is the highest mountain in the Eddys (a subrange of the Klamath Mountains), the highest point in Trinity County, and the highest mountain W of Interstate 5. The mountain was named after Olive Paddock Eddy, the first woman to climb Mt. Shasta. From this majestic peak we will be able to see Lassen Peak, Mt. Mc Loughlin, the Scott Mountains, the Eddy Range, Black Butte, Castle Crags Spire and of course Mt. Shasta towering over everything in sight.

Meet at 9 am at the Fish Hatchery a quarter-mile west of the main Mount Shasta exit off I-5. Bring lunch and water. Hiking poles recommended. We expect to return by 6 pm. For questions call Joan Roemer at 926-0647.

MSTA member Stephanie Hoffman at Middle Deadfall Lake.
MSTA member Stephanie Hoffman at Middle Deadfall Lake.

Pacific Crest Trail Film Premier May 19 at College of the Siskiyous

The Pacific Crest Trail Association, in partnership with the Mt Shasta Trail Association and the College of the Siskiyous, is pleased to announce the free public premier screening of the visually stunning National Geographic Channel’s new film, “America’s Wild Places,” starring the Pacific Crest Trail.

“This adventurous film presents an array of many of the spectacular scenes hikers can encounter on this 2,650 mile-long footpath that courses from Campo, California, at the U.S./Mexican border, to Manning Park in British Columbia, Canada,” says MSTA President Joe Wirth. “For outdoor enthusiasts who don’t have the time or endurance to hike the entire route, this is the best chance you’ll have for learning why the trail was created, how it is used today, and what it offers to hikers.”

Some of the more diverse features that can be encountered along the route from the south to the north include the cactus gardens of Anza Borrego Desert, the glaciated peaks of the High Sierra, Forester Pass at 13,153-foot elevation (highest point on the PCT), Devil’s Postpile, Crater Lake National Park, Three Sisters Wilderness, Mount Hood Wilderness, Cascade Locks (lowest point on the trail), Bridge of the Gods, Mount Adams, Snoqualmie Pass, and the North Cascades National Park.

When added up, the total elevation change along the entire route is 300,000 feet. Whew! Each year about 300 “thru-hikers” attempt to do the entire route in about four months, and they must deal with setting up food caches, severe weather, dehydration, and pesky black bears. Hikers must be prepared for climate extremes from scorching deserts in the south to drenching rainforests in the north. Displays of sprawling wildflowers create colorful breaks between towering stands of solemn old-growth forests.

”This special screening is an opportunity for you to see the Pacific Crest Trail like you’ve never seen it before, even if you’ve hiked it!” says Wirth. “And if you’re considering getting out onto the PCT, this film will only motivate you further to make your PCT experience happen! We have 120 miles of the PCT in Siskiyou County, and the trek from Burney Falls to the Oregon Border totals a challenging 275 miles.”

Liz Bergeron, Executive Director of the Pacific Crest Trail Association, will be on hand to answer questions, and a dedicated, hard working PCT trail work crew will explain the challenges of creating and maintaining the trail.

Program time and date: 7:00 PM, Wednesday May 19th.
Place: the COS campus in Weed: Building 3, Room 3, the Life Sciences Building, adjacent to Parking Lot A.
Admission: Free.
Food and Drink: Coffee and desserts will be served.
More information: 926-2858

Mount Shasta from the Pacific Crest Trail. (Photo by John Soares)
Mount Shasta from the Pacific Crest Trail. (Photo by John Soares)
The Pacific Crest Trail Association, in partnership with the Mt Shasta Trail
Association and the College of the Siskiyou, is pleased to announce the free
public primer screening of the visually stunning National Geographic
Channel¹s new film, ³America¹s Wild Places², starring the Pacific Crest
Trail.

³This adventurous film presents an array of many of the spectacular scenes
hikers can encounter on this 2,650 mile-long footpath that courses from
Campo, California, at the U.S./Mexican border, to Manning Park in British
Columbia, Canada,² says MSTA President Joe Wirth. ³For outdoor enthusiasts
who don¹t have the time or endurance to hike the entire route, this is the
best chance you¹ll have for learning why the trail was created, how it is
used today, and what it offers to hikers.²

Some of the more diverse features that can be encountered along the route
from the south to the north include the cactus gardens of Anza Borrego
Desert, the glaciated peaks of the High Sierra, Forester Pass at 13,153 feet
elevation (highest point on the PCT), Devil¹s Postpile, Crater Lake National
Park, Three Sisters Wilderness, Mount Hood Wilderness, Cascade Locks (lowest
point on the trail), Bridge of the Gods, Mount Adams, Snoqualmie Pass, and
the North Cascades National Park.

When added up, the total elevation change along the entire route is 300,000
feet. Whew! Each year about 300 ³Thru-hikers² attempt to do the entire route
in about four months, and they must deal with setting up food caches, severe
weather, dehydration, and pesty black bears. Hikers must be prepared for
climate extremes from scorching deserts in the south to drenching
rainforests in the north. Displays of sprawling wildflowers create colorful
breaks between towering stands of solemn old-growth forests.

³This special screening is an opportunity for you to see the Pacific Crest
Trail like you¹ve never seen it before, even if you¹ve hiked it!² says
Wirth.  ³And if you¹re considering getting out onto the PCT, this film will
only motivate you further to make your PCT experience happen! We have 120
miles of the PCT in Siskiyou County, and the trek from Burney Falls to the
Oregon Border totals a challenging 275 miles.²

Liz Bergeron, Executive Director of the Pacific Crest Trail Association,
will be on hand to answer questions, and a dedicated, hard working PCT trail
work crew will explain the challenges of creating and maintaining the trail.

Program time and date: 7:00 PM, Wednesday May 19th.
Place:  the COS campus in Weed: Building 3, Room 3, the Life Sciences
Building, adjacent to Parking Lot A.
Admission:  Free.
Coffee and deserts will be served.
More information: 926-2858