PCT Maintenance and Training in Castle Crags State Park, June 25, 2011

Summer is finally here – Are you ready to hit the trails?

It’s time to replace our winter boots, scarves, and mittens with hiking boots, hard hats and gloves! We’re ready to hit the trails and we would love for you join us! The Mount Shasta Trail Association and the Pacific Crest Trail Association invite you on a one-day trail maintenance and training session where we’ll learn about:

* Trail Safety
* Trail Maintenance Tools
* Terminology

We’ll apply our new knowledge to the Pacific Crest Trail by repairing tread and improving the corridor. This project is great for beginner’s and for those who are ready to get warmed up for a great trail maintenance season! In other words, all skill levels are welcome!

When: Saturday, June 25 from 9:00 am to 2:00ish pm

Where: Parking area at Soda Creek Road Exit (this is where the PCT crosses I-5 just north of the Castle Crags State Park entrance). Directions will be provided upon registration.

What to Bring: Volunteers will need to bring day packs, lunch, water, and work clothes (i.e. pants, sturdy boots). Safety gear and tools will be provided.

Fitness Requirement: This project is great for everyone! Volunteers will hike 1-2 miles throughout the day on the Pacific Crest Trail.

Positions Available: 10-12

Nearby attractions: Camping and hiking in Castle Crags State Park, fishing along the Sacramento River, and gazing at beautiful Mount Shasta!

To Register: Please contact Robert Francisco at Shastamountain@gmail.com or call (916) 955-8641.

We’re looking forward to seeing you on the Pacific Crest Trail!

Dog Trail Clean-Up and Maintenance this Saturday, October 2 2010

Late-breaking news. You can help the River Exchange do some needed cleaning and trail maintenance on the Dog Trail, which accesses the Pacific Crest Trail from the south side of Castle Crags near Castle Creek.

Here are the details:

The River Exchange is reaching out for help from the community for a Dog Trail Clean-Up and Maintenance Day on Saturday, October 2nd at 9:00 a.m. The Dog Trail is a popular access trail to the Pacific Crest Trail in the Castle Crags Wilderness Area. Helpers of all ages and abilities are encouraged to participate in performing some much-needed maintenance on Dog Trail, with direction from local U.S. Forest Service Recreation Officer, Kai Allen.

Volunteers are being asked to lend a hand to clean up the Dog Trail trailhead parking area, perform basic trail maintenance and to place new signs marking the Wilderness Boundary. The need for this work was identified by the survey team who inventoried the recreation impacts in Castle Crags Wilderness Area this summer. The survey was funded by a National Forest Foundation -Wilderness Stewardship Challenge grant awarded to The River Exchange to partner with the U.S. Forest Service.

A limited number of volunteers will be able to participate in this event, so prospective volunteers are asked to contact The River Exchange to register. Volunteers are asked to wear sturdy boots, long-sleeved shirt, long pants and work gloves. Volunteers should also bring a lunch, water and sunscreen. Garbage bags and all of the required work tools will be provided by The River Exchange and the Shasta-Trinity National Forest.

For more information and to register for the Dog Trailhead Clean-up Day, contact The River Exchange at 235-2012 or at mail@riverexchange.org.

The River Exchange is a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization dedicated to promoting healthy watersheds through education, stewardship, restoration and community involvement.

Robin Singler,

Administrative Director

The River Exchange

www.riverexchange.org

Seven Lakes Basin Hike on the PCT on Saturday, September 25

The Mount Shasta Trail Association invites you to join us on a spectacular hike along the Pacific Crest Trail ridge overlooking the pristine lakes of Seven Lake Basin as well as Mumbo Basin. This gentle to moderate 5 mile roundtrip walk has superb long-range vistas. We will be able to see panoramas of the Trinity Alps, Trinity Divide, Mt. Shasta, Mt. Eddy, Lassen Peak, Magee Peak, Burney Mountain as well as the granite cliffs of the Castle Crags.

Meet 9 am at the Fish Hatchery in Mount Shasta. (Take the second/main Mount Shasta exit and go a quarter-mile west away from town and the mountain.) Bring lunch and water. We expect to be back by 3 pm. Any further questions:  call Joan Roemer 926-0647.

Seven Lakes Basin. (Photo by John Soares)
Seven Lakes Basin. (Photo by John Soares)

Pacific Crest Trail Film Premier May 19 at College of the Siskiyous

The Pacific Crest Trail Association, in partnership with the Mt Shasta Trail Association and the College of the Siskiyous, is pleased to announce the free public premier screening of the visually stunning National Geographic Channel’s new film, “America’s Wild Places,” starring the Pacific Crest Trail.

“This adventurous film presents an array of many of the spectacular scenes hikers can encounter on this 2,650 mile-long footpath that courses from Campo, California, at the U.S./Mexican border, to Manning Park in British Columbia, Canada,” says MSTA President Joe Wirth. “For outdoor enthusiasts who don’t have the time or endurance to hike the entire route, this is the best chance you’ll have for learning why the trail was created, how it is used today, and what it offers to hikers.”

Some of the more diverse features that can be encountered along the route from the south to the north include the cactus gardens of Anza Borrego Desert, the glaciated peaks of the High Sierra, Forester Pass at 13,153-foot elevation (highest point on the PCT), Devil’s Postpile, Crater Lake National Park, Three Sisters Wilderness, Mount Hood Wilderness, Cascade Locks (lowest point on the trail), Bridge of the Gods, Mount Adams, Snoqualmie Pass, and the North Cascades National Park.

When added up, the total elevation change along the entire route is 300,000 feet. Whew! Each year about 300 “thru-hikers” attempt to do the entire route in about four months, and they must deal with setting up food caches, severe weather, dehydration, and pesky black bears. Hikers must be prepared for climate extremes from scorching deserts in the south to drenching rainforests in the north. Displays of sprawling wildflowers create colorful breaks between towering stands of solemn old-growth forests.

”This special screening is an opportunity for you to see the Pacific Crest Trail like you’ve never seen it before, even if you’ve hiked it!” says Wirth. “And if you’re considering getting out onto the PCT, this film will only motivate you further to make your PCT experience happen! We have 120 miles of the PCT in Siskiyou County, and the trek from Burney Falls to the Oregon Border totals a challenging 275 miles.”

Liz Bergeron, Executive Director of the Pacific Crest Trail Association, will be on hand to answer questions, and a dedicated, hard working PCT trail work crew will explain the challenges of creating and maintaining the trail.

Program time and date: 7:00 PM, Wednesday May 19th.
Place: the COS campus in Weed: Building 3, Room 3, the Life Sciences Building, adjacent to Parking Lot A.
Admission: Free.
Food and Drink: Coffee and desserts will be served.
More information: 926-2858

Mount Shasta from the Pacific Crest Trail. (Photo by John Soares)
Mount Shasta from the Pacific Crest Trail. (Photo by John Soares)
The Pacific Crest Trail Association, in partnership with the Mt Shasta Trail
Association and the College of the Siskiyou, is pleased to announce the free
public primer screening of the visually stunning National Geographic
Channel¹s new film, ³America¹s Wild Places², starring the Pacific Crest
Trail.

³This adventurous film presents an array of many of the spectacular scenes
hikers can encounter on this 2,650 mile-long footpath that courses from
Campo, California, at the U.S./Mexican border, to Manning Park in British
Columbia, Canada,² says MSTA President Joe Wirth. ³For outdoor enthusiasts
who don¹t have the time or endurance to hike the entire route, this is the
best chance you¹ll have for learning why the trail was created, how it is
used today, and what it offers to hikers.²

Some of the more diverse features that can be encountered along the route
from the south to the north include the cactus gardens of Anza Borrego
Desert, the glaciated peaks of the High Sierra, Forester Pass at 13,153 feet
elevation (highest point on the PCT), Devil¹s Postpile, Crater Lake National
Park, Three Sisters Wilderness, Mount Hood Wilderness, Cascade Locks (lowest
point on the trail), Bridge of the Gods, Mount Adams, Snoqualmie Pass, and
the North Cascades National Park.

When added up, the total elevation change along the entire route is 300,000
feet. Whew! Each year about 300 ³Thru-hikers² attempt to do the entire route
in about four months, and they must deal with setting up food caches, severe
weather, dehydration, and pesty black bears. Hikers must be prepared for
climate extremes from scorching deserts in the south to drenching
rainforests in the north. Displays of sprawling wildflowers create colorful
breaks between towering stands of solemn old-growth forests.

³This special screening is an opportunity for you to see the Pacific Crest
Trail like you¹ve never seen it before, even if you¹ve hiked it!² says
Wirth.  ³And if you¹re considering getting out onto the PCT, this film will
only motivate you further to make your PCT experience happen! We have 120
miles of the PCT in Siskiyou County, and the trek from Burney Falls to the
Oregon Border totals a challenging 275 miles.²

Liz Bergeron, Executive Director of the Pacific Crest Trail Association,
will be on hand to answer questions, and a dedicated, hard working PCT trail
work crew will explain the challenges of creating and maintaining the trail.

Program time and date: 7:00 PM, Wednesday May 19th.
Place:  the COS campus in Weed: Building 3, Room 3, the Life Sciences
Building, adjacent to Parking Lot A.
Admission:  Free.
Coffee and deserts will be served.
More information: 926-2858

Burstarse Falls Hike on Saturday May 1

Few folks know about Burstarse Falls, a mighty waterfall that free falls some 40 feet over granite walls. In addition to solitude, this hike also offers extensive views of Castle Crags’ steep granite spires and clear, cold streams.

Come join us for this moderate 6.4 mile hike which includes 2.5 miles on the impressive Pacific Crest Trail.

Meet at the Fish Hatchery at the end of Lake Street in Mount Shasta at 9 am. Bring lunch and water.

Further questions: call hike leader Joan Roemer 926-0647.

Read more about Burstarse Falls.

Castle Crags near Burstarse Falls. Photo by John Soares.
Castle Crags near Burstarse Falls. Photo by John Soares.